Little Bits of History

Thrown Games

Posted in History by patriciahysell on September 26, 2012

Edward Marvin “Big Ed” Reulbach

September 26, 1908: Edward Marvin “Big Ed” Reulbach pitches in a double header. Ed was a right-handed pitcher for the Chicago Cubs, a Major League Baseball (MLB) team, during their glory years of the early 1900s. The year 1908 was his best year on the mound. During that year the Cubs won 24 games for the National League (NL) and the World Series, their last Series win. However, this was not Big Ed’s first Series win. In 1907, the Cubs beat the Detroit Tigers 4-0 and in 1906, although losing overall to the Chicago White Sox, in game two, Reulbach gave up only one hit in the seventh inning. Only five games in the history of the Series have seen this low-hit record. But even better than that, on this day Reulbach pitched two shutouts back to back against the Brooklyn Dodgers, a feat not yet repeated.

MLB is professional baseball consisting of American teams playing in either the NL or the American League (AL). The two leagues merged in 2000 into a single MLB led by the Commissioner of Baseball. There are 30 teams, 20 from the US and one from Canada. While merged under MLB, the two leagues remain separate entities. The NL is the older of the two, founded on February 2, 1876. There are currently 16 teams in the NL. The AL was founded on January 28, 1901 and has 14 teams. In 2013 the numbers will change to 15 teams each when the Houston Astros transfer to the AL.

The World Series, a best of seven games event, began in 1903. The best team of the AL plays the first NL team. The home team advantage is split and the first team to win four games is the Champion. The games are played in October and it is sometimes known as the Fall Classic. The New York Yankees (AL) have played in 40 World Series and won 27. The Oakland/Philadelphia Athletics (AL) have played in 14 and won 9 times. The record holders for the NL are the St. Louis Cardinals who have won 11 of the 18 times they played and second is a tie between the San Francisco/New York Giants and the Los Angeles/Brooklyn Dodgers who have each played 18 Series and won 6 times.

The Chicago Cubs now belong to the Central Division of the NL. They formed in 1903 after the Chicago Orphans (1898-1902), Chicago Colts (1890-97), and Chicago White Stockings (1870-71, 1874-89) rotated through. They are affectionately called The Cubbies, The North Siders, or The Boys in Blue. They have been playing at Wrigley Field since 1916. Ed was pitching at West Side Park. He also pitched them to their two World Series titles. They have taken the NL pennant 16 times, the last in 1945. They have taken the Central Division title three times, last in 2008 and before that the East Division title twice. They are owned by the family trust of Joe Ricketts. Dale Sveum is the manager and Jed Hoyer is the general manager.

Poets are like baseball pitchers. Both have their moments. The intervals are the tough things. – Robert Frost

Baseball is like church. Many attend few understand. – Leo Durocher

Baseball is one of the most beautiful games. It is. It is a very Zen-like game. – Jim Jarmusch

In baseball, there’s always the next day. – Ryne Sandberg

Also on this day:

The Parthenon – In 1687, part of the Parthenon was destroyed during a bombing attack by the Ottoman Turks.
Apples – In 1774, Johnny Appleseed was born.
Lurking Evil – In 1937, The Shadow premiered.

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One Response

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  1. Dave Anders said, on September 26, 2012 at 3:46 pm

    You are comparing teams in different eras that played under different rules- what happened in the early 1900s has no bearing on the teams of the 1950s to now.


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